Intrusive monitoring by parents actually leads adolescents to increase their risky online behavior

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The concern of many parents regarding their children’s online habits tend to relate to hazardous behaviors, ranging from the disclosure of personal information on public forums and revealing feelings to strangers, to face-to-face meetings with strangers. Parents, naturally, want to prevent such precarious behaviors to the degree possible without infringing on their teens’ feeling of independence.

Parents who very closely monitor their children’s Internet use in an attempt to reduce unsafe online behavior may actually be achieving the opposite effect, according to a new study conducted by University of Haifa researchers. “It seems that during adolescence, during which teens are seeking ways to achieve autonomy, overly restrictive monitoring actually motivates them to seek ways to circumvent the supervision,” say the researchers.

The concern of many parents regarding their children’s online habits tend to relate to hazardous behaviors, ranging from the disclosure of personal information on public forums and revealing feelings to strangers, to face-to-face meetings with strangers. Parents, naturally, want to prevent such precarious behaviors to the degree possible without infringing on their teens’ feeling of independence.

This study, conducted by Prof. Gustavo Mesch and doctoral student Hagit Sasson at the University’s Department of Sociology and Anthropology, examined parental efforts to cope with their children’s Internet use on the one hand and compared them to the teenagers’ perception of their peer group’s social norms.

Parental efforts were divided into three categories: Mediation through supervision, which includes the installation of software that blocks sites, records which sites were visited, or limits the amount of time spent online; mediation through guidance, in which parents attempted to explain the risks posed by the Internet, provided help in using the Internet, suggested ways to use the Internet safely, and helped their children when something bothered them online; and non-intervention. The study included 495 children aged 10-18.

Surprisingly, the more aggressive “supervision” approach led to the most negative results: The more parents used this approach, the more their children would engage in risky online behavior. There was no link, positive or negative, between the other two approaches and risky Internet use.

It was also found that in families that were cohesive and demonstrated strong emotional bonding, adolescents were less likely to engage in risky Internet behavior. “These are not exactly two sides of the same coin, but the patterns are certainly clear,” the researchers note. “Supervisory behavior, which can be linked to a lack of trust in the child, will lead to an increase in unsafe behavior. In contrast, as has been found by other studies, families that knew how to establish a relationship of trust among family members reduced risky behavior.”

A perhaps less surprising finding was that the strongest influence on risky online behavior was what the adolescents’ friends thought of such behavior. The more the kids thought that their friends approved of precarious online behavior, the more they themselves would engage in such behavior. “It’s possible that this is an example of self-persuasion,” the researchers say. “Someone who behaves dangerously online is liable to convince himself that as far as his friends are concerned, it’s okay.”

Similar to previous studies, the researchers found that boys are more likely to be involved in risky online behavior than girls. They also found that more boys than girls visited chat rooms and online forums, which increased the chances of them being exposed to online threats since these are platforms that invite interaction with strangers. The only gender-based difference noticed with regard to parental behavior was that parents were more likely to mediate their daughters’ Internet use with guidance than their sons’.


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The above story is based on materials provided by University of Haifa. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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University of Haifa. “Intrusive monitoring of internet use by parents actually leads adolescents to increase their risky online behavior.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 January 2015.

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Essential Oil Spotlight: Ylang Ylang

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Ylang Ylang essential oil is derived from the star-shaped flowers of the tropical Ylang Ylang tree and is used extensively in making perfumes and in aromatherapy. Similar to Jasmine, Ylang Ylang is considered an aphrodisiac and has been used for centuries in religious and wedding ceremonies. In aromatherapy, Ylang Ylang is used to lessen tension […]

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Organic Producers Accused of ‘Factory Farm’ Conditions that Violate Organic Law

Organic Milk and Egg Producers Accused of 'Factory Farm' Conditions that Violate Organic Law

An investigation conducted by the Cornucopia Institute, a Wisconsin-based farm policy research group, has discovered violations at 14 industrial livestock operations producing animal products marketed, illegally, the group alleges, as organic. Illegal, because these factory farm conditions are not in compliance with organic laws.

The Cornucopia Institute says that after years of inaction by the USDA on the issue, it obtained aerial photographs in nine states of industrial-scale confinement facilities that fly in the face of the organic standards developed to protect the American people from factory produced animal products.

Captured in the photos taken in states including Texas, New York and Maryland, the Cornucopia Institute revealed that the animals were not given access to outdoors or grazing opportunities as required by the federal organic regulations.

“The federal organic regulations make it very clear that all organic livestock must have access to the outdoors and that ruminants, like dairy cows, must have access to pasture,” said Mark A. Kastel, Senior Farm Policy Analyst at the Wisconsin-based Cornucopia Institute. “The vast majority of these massive, industrial-scale facilities, some managing 10,000-20,000 head of cattle, and upwards of 1 million laying hens, had 100% of their animals confined in giant buildings or feedlots.”

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The photos depict factory farm-like facilities that support brands including Horizon and Aurora, two companies still under investigation by the USDA after Cornucopia filed complaints over similar violations back in 2004.

“In the chicken industry the USDA has allowed corporate agribusiness to confine as many as 100,000 laying hens in a building, sometimes exceeding 1 million birds on a ‘farm,’ and substituting a tiny screened porch for true access to the outdoors,” the group said in a statement on its website. “Quite frankly, even if Miles McEvoy, who currently directs the [National Organic Program], believes that a porch, with a floor, ceiling and screened walls, constitutes ‘the outdoors,’ if only 5% of the birds have access or can fit in that space, then 95% of the others are being illegally confined,” Cornucopia’s Kastel stated.

sm-AuroraDublin-02

“Shoppers, who passionately support the ideals and values represented by the organic label, understandably feel betrayed when they see photos of these massive CAFOs (concentrated animal feeding operations) masquerading as organic,” Kastel added.

Find Jill on Twitter @jillettinger

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How are student loans affecting the well-being of young adults?

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Young adults who accumulated higher amounts of debt incurred from student loans reported higher levels of depressive symptoms, even with adjustments for parental wealth, childhood socioeconomic status, and other factors, researchers have found.

When it comes to what stresses out young adults, student loan repayment is often at the top of the list. As annual student loan borrowing has become increasingly commonplace in the United States, the question of how the burden of a large loan looming at the beginning of independent adulthood affects the mental health of young people is one that has not been looked at until recently.

Researchers at the University of South Carolina and the University of California, Los Angeles posed two questions: What is the association between the amount that students accrue during undergraduate studies and their mental well-being post graduation, when they are between the ages of 25-31; and what is the association between annual student loan borrowing and the mental well being of currently enrolled students?

In the first nationally representative study to specifically look at the effects of student loans on health, lead author Katrina Walsemann set out to examine the relationship between student loans and early adult mental health. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, a nationally representative sample of young adults in the Unites States, researchers found that those who had higher amounts of debt incurred from student loans reported higher levels of depressive symptoms, even with adjustments for parental wealth, childhood socioeconomic status, and other factors. “We are speculating that part of the reason that these types of loans are so stressful is the fact that you cannot defer them, they follow you for the rest of your life until you pay them off,” Walsemann said.

The study of the effect of student loan debt is significant given the ongoing rise in the costs of obtaining a college degree. In 2012, student loan debt totalled over $1 trillion in the United States, making this type of loan second only to home mortgage debt. “We speculate that the American middle class is suffering the most from post-graduation debt, since they do not qualify for governmental assistance, nor is their family able to take on the bulk of the costs associated with college,” Walsemann said.

There is still further research to be done, Walsemann notes, especially regarding student loan debt and the possible spillover effects into other life decisions, such as occupational choices or delaying marriage and children, and other health inequities.


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The above story is based on materials provided by University of South Carolina.Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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University of South Carolina. “How are student loans affecting the well-being of young adults?.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 January 2015.

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Rare disease shines light on health of essential nerve cells

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PelizaeusMerzbacher disease, or PMD, is a devastating neurological condition that, in its most severe form, kills infants weeks after birth. Thirty years ago, a neuroscientist noticed a genetic mutation in dogs that was practically identical to the disease in humans. Now, that has laid out the results of his marathon pursuit of PMD.

White areas in the brain of a healthy dog show axons (neural conductive fibers) with normal myelin sheathing (white) are pictured. The brain of a dog that models a genetic disease called Pelizaeus Merzbacher shows a total absence of myelin insulation. Studies in the lab of Ian Duncan at the University of Wisconsin-Madison suggest myelin may slowly develop in the spinal cord but not brain in this often-fatal disease. Credit: Josh Mayer

Ian Duncan is a Scotsman with the iron discipline and stamina of a competitive marathoner, triathlete and cross-country skier. As a neuroscientist at the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he’s applied his tenacity to a rare genetic disorder.

Known as Pelizaeus Merzbacher disease or PMD, it’s a devastating neurological condition that, in its most severe form, kills infants weeks after birth.

Thirty years ago, Duncan noticed a genetic mutation in dogs that was practically identical to the disease in humans. Now, in the online edition of the journal Neurobiology of Disease, Duncan has laid out the results of his marathon pursuit of PMD.

His work underscores the benefits of patience and persistence in the discovery of unexpected results that may point toward new therapies.

Like multiple sclerosis, PMD is a disease that interferes with myelin, the insulation needed for normal communication in the nervous system. The genetic mutation that blocks the formation of myelin is found on the X chromosome, so the disease occurs only in males.

Studies of the dogs are crucial, Duncan says, since PMD is so rare in humans — occurring in one male birth in roughly 200,000.

Duncan says his studies have yielded discoveries that could help fight the grievous illness.

First, Duncan determined that in dogs, myelin in the spinal cord is gradually generated after birth, proving that the cells that make myelin survive and work in some regions. “The brain is acting differently than the spinal cord,” Duncan says. “It’s striking, on day one there is no myelin. But after some months the spinal cord develops myelin and by two years it is almost normal, but the brain is not, and the lack of myelin is the cause of death.”

In these dogs, and presumably in human PMD, there are abnormally few myelin-forming cells, or oligodendrocytes, in the brain and spinal cord. “For reasons we don’t know, the spinal cord repairs because the number of those cells increases with time, but this doesn’t happen in the brain.”

Second, nerve fibers called axons totally lacking myelin have survived for more than two years in the dogs, flouting the accepted wisdom that axons cannot survive without myelin. (Axons are fibers that connect nerve cells to each other, and to muscles.) If lack of myelin is not a death sentence for the axon, the clinical picture for many myelin-related diseases is much brighter, Duncan says.

Third, the recognition that myelin-making cells are still active is shifting Duncan’s focus toward drugs that can increase their number and activity.

“There is hope that several drugs already on the market could stimulate the production of more myelin,” he says. “That could help PMD patients — both human and canine — and potentially MS patients as well.”

That concept is already being tested in MS patients in a phase 1 trial at the University of California, San Francisco.

Unlike MS, PMD is a genetic disorder, suggesting the need for gene therapy. However, Duncan suspects that simply increasing the number of myelin-producing cells early in PMD might cause myelin formation in the brain as well as the spinal cord, eliminating the need for gene therapy.

Finally, Duncan says, his studies make clear that oligodendrocytes — cells that create a protective sheath around myelin — develop differently in the spinal cord than in the brain.

“It’s a big surprise,” he says. “Neurologists have focused on the brain, which is bigger and easier to image.”

Duncan says the dog model of PMD is “strikingly similar to the human disease which we are unable to study in any detail. This is a naturally occurring disease, and our study of it will generate treatments for dogs and for humans alike.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Wisconsin-Madison. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Joshua A. Mayer, Ian R. Griffiths, James E. Goldman, Chelsey M. Smith, Elizabeth Cooksey, Abigail B. Radcliff, Ian D. Duncan. Modeling the natural history of Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease. Neurobiology of Disease, 2015; 75: 115 DOI: 10.1016/j.nbd.2014.12.023

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University of Wisconsin-Madison. “Rare neurological disease shines light on health of essential nerve cells.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 January 2015. .

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DIY Yoga Mat Spray

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Yoga is a great way to increase your physical and emotional well-being.  Whether you’re an extreme yogi or are just beginning, a good yoga mat spray is a must.

PLEASE NOTE: Not all yoga mats are treated the same. Using essential oils may ruin some yoga mats. Spray a test patch on a small part of  your mat first to make sure it isn’t affected by the mixture.

What You Need:

3/4 cup distilled water

1/4 cup alcohol-free witch hazel or white vinegar

5 drops Lavender essential oil

3 drops Melaleuca essential oil

Glass spray bottle

Directions:

Combine all ingredients into glass spray bottle. Shake until combined. To use, spray on mat and wipe dry with towel.

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– See more at: http://doterrablog.com/diy-yoga-mat-spray/#sthash.er6rRXRV.dpuf

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Study reveals lack of data on opioid drugs for chronic pain

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Researchers have found little to no evidence for the effectiveness of opioid drugs in the treatment of long-term chronic pain, despite the explosive recent growth in the use of the drugs. ional Institutes of Health white paper that was released today finds little to no evidence for the effectiveness of opioid drugs in the treatment of long-term chronic pain, despite the explosive recent growth in the use of the drugs.

The paper, which constitutes the final report of a seven-member panel convened by the NIH last September, finds that many of the studies used to justify the prescription of these drugs were either poorly conducted or of an insufficient duration.
An NIH white paper finds little to no evidence for the effectiveness of opioid drugs in the treatment of long-term chronic pain.
That makes prolific use of these drugs surprising, says Dr. David Steffens, chair of the psychiatry department at UConn Health and one of the authors of the study. When it comes to long-term pain, he says, “there’s no research-based evidence that these medicines are helpful.”
Yet despite this, prescriptions for opioid drugs (also known as opiate drugs; the two terms are technically distinct, but most physicians use them interchangeably) have more than tripled in the past 20 years, with more than 219 million prescriptions written in 2011, according to the study.
At the same time, the abuse of these drugs has also skyrocketed, leading some to refer to prescription drug abuse as an epidemic. More than 16,000 people died from prescription opioid overdoses in 2012, according to the Centers for Disease Control, and drug overdose now causes more deaths than motor vehicle accidents for people ages 25-64.
This level of opioid use and abuse is unprecedented in the world: the United States, with just 4.6 percent of the world’s population, consumes 80 percent of the world’s opioid drugs. That, says Steffens, makes this “a peculiarly American problem.”
Steffens, like the other members of the panel, was surprised by many of these findings, since he is not an expert in opioid drugs, in drug abuse, or in pain management. The members of the panel were experienced clinicians with expertise in other areas; Steffens’ specialty is geriatric psychiatry. “The NIH intentionally invited people from other fields of medicine,” he says, “in order to avoid potential conflicts of interest, and to get a fresh perspective on the issue.”
Over two days, the panel listened to evidence presented by an outside agency, which had conducted an exhaustive search of all the available studies about the use of opioid drugs. The panel’s draft report was made available for public comment late last fall. The final report is published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
Steffens notes that one of the great challenges in grappling with this issue is the fact that opioid drugs clearly are an effective treatment for some people dealing with pain, but it is hard to predict where trouble will crop up. Part of the problem, he points out, is the need for better communication about best practices to physicians who are prescribing these drugs.

“There are certain syndromes, like fibromyalgia, where opioids are less likely to be effective and patients are more likely get into trouble with abuse,” says Steffens.

Another issue both for patients and for society at large is that pills from the pharmacy don’t always end up in the hands they were prescribed for. The process of medicine being sold or given away (known as diversion) has long been identified as a key driver in the rise of prescription drug abuse.
Says Steffens, “I wish that doctors treating people for sports or workplace injuries would be cautious with the amount of pills they dispense.”
Story Source:
The above story is based on materials provided by University of Connecticut. The original article was written by Tim Miller. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.
Journal Reference:
David B. Reuben, Anika A. H. Alvanzo, Takamaru Ashikaga, G. Anne Bogat, Christopher M. Callahan, Victoria Ruffing, David C. Steffens. National Institutes of Health Pathways to Prevention Workshop: The Role of Opioids in the Treatment of Chronic Pain. Annals of Internal Medicine, 2015; DOI: 10.7326/M14-2775

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University of Connecticut. “Study reveals lack of data on opioid drugs for chronic pain.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 January
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2014 Slim & Sassy Grand Prize Winner: SHARMILA LAPANA

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2014 SLIM & SASSY Grand Prize Winner, Sharmila Lapana A mother of five from New Zealand, Sharmila Lapana was tired of the health problems caused by her weight gain. Inspired by the example of others, including past Slim & Sassy contest winners, Sharmila made big changes to her lifestyle and joined the Slim & Sassy competition. During the competition she lost […]

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Episiotomies: Use of surgical procedure to facilitate child birth declines

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Between 2006 and 2012 in the U.S., there was a decline in rates of episiotomy, a surgical procedure for widening the outlet of the birth canal to make it easier for the mother to give birth, according to a study. Episiotomy is a common obstetric procedure, estimated to be performed in 25 percent of vaginal deliveries in the United States in 2004. Restrictive use of episiotomy has been recommended given the risks of the procedure and unclear benefits of routine use.

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Lack of exercise responsible for twice as many early deaths as obesity

Original content comes to us from Living Well News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1E0xLUL

A brisk 20 minute walk each day could be enough to reduce an individual’s risk of early death, according to new research published today. The study of over 334,000 European men and women found that twice as many deaths may be attributable to lack of physical activity compared with the number of deaths attributable to obesity, but that just a modest increase in physical activity could have significant health benefits.

Physical inactivity has been consistently associated with an increased risk of early death, as well as being associated with a greater risk of diseases such as heart disease and cancer. Although it may also contribute to an increased body mass index (BMI) and obesity, the association with early death is independent of an individual’s BMI.
To measure the link between physical inactivity and premature death, and its interaction with obesity, researchers analysed data from 334,161 men and women across Europe participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Study. Over an average of 12 years, the researchers measured height, weight and waist circumference, and used self-assessment to measure levels of physical activity. The results are published today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
The researchers found that the greatest reduction in risk of premature death occurred in the comparison between inactive and moderately inactive groups, judged by combining activity at work with recreational activity; just under a quarter (22.7%) of participants were categorised as inactive, reporting no recreational activity in combination with a sedentary occupation. The authors estimate that doing exercise equivalent to just a 20 minute brisk walk each day — burning between 90 and 110 kcal (‘calories’) — would take an individual from the inactive to moderately inactive group and reduce their risk of premature death by between 16-30%. The impact was greatest amongst normal weight individuals, but even those with higher BMI saw a benefit.
Using the most recent available data on deaths in Europe the researchers estimate that 337,000 of the 9.2 million deaths amongst European men and women were attributable to obesity (classed as a BMI greater than 30): however, double this number of deaths (676,000) could be attributed to physical inactivity.
Professor Ulf Ekelund from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge, who led the study, says: “This is a simple message: just a small amount of physical activity each day could have substantial health benefits for people who are physically inactive. Although we found that just 20 minutes would make a difference, we should really be looking to do more than this — physical activity has many proven health benefits and should be an important part of our daily life.”
Professor Nick Wareham, Director of the MRC Unit, adds: “Helping people to lose weight can be a real challenge, and whilst we should continue to aim at reducing population levels of obesity, public health interventions that encourage people to make small but achievable changes in physical activity can have significant health benefits and may be easier to achieve and maintain.”
Story Source:
The above story is based on materials provided by University of Cambridge. The original story is licensed under a Creative Commons Licence. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.
Journal Reference:
Ulf Ekelund, Heather A Ward, Teresa Norat, Jian’an Luan, Anne M May, Elisabete Weiderpass, Stephen S Sharp, Kim Overvad, Jane Nautrup Østergaard, Anne Tjønneland, Nina Føns Johnsen, Sylvie Mesrine, Agnès Fournier, Guy Fagherazzi, Antonia Trichopoulou, Pagona Lagiou, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Kuanrong Li, Rudolf Kaaks, Pietro Ferrari, Idlir Licaj, Mazda Jenab, Manuela Bergmann, Heiner Boeing, Domenico Palli, Sabina Sieri, Salvatore Panico, Rosario Tumino, Paolo Vineis, Petra H Peeters, Evelyn Monnikhof, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, J Ramón Quirós, Antonio Agudo, María-José Sánchez, José María Huerta, Eva Ardanaz, Larraitz Arriola, Bo Hedblad, Elisabet Wirfält, Malin Sund, Mattias Johansson, Timothy J Key, Ruth C Travis, Kay-Tee Khaw, Søren Brage, Nicholas J Wareham, and Elio Riboli. Physical activity and all-cause mortality across levels of overall and abdominal adiposity in European men and women: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Study (EPIC). Am J Clin Nutr, January 14, 2015 DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.114.100065

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Essential Oil Spotlight: Citrus Bliss

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Citrus Bliss, dōTERRA®’s Invigorating Blend, merges the benefits of citrus essential oils. We combine the powerful essences of Wild Orange, Lemon, Grapefruit, Mandarin, Bergamot, Tangerine, and Clementine with a hint of Vanilla Absolute to form this unique and harmonious blend. With benefits that extend beyond elevating mood and reducing stress, Citrus Bliss has natural, potent […]

To begin experiencing dōTERRA Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade essential oils simply visit http://ift.tt/1pS67Qr and click shop or to become a Wellness advocate and enjoy all the benefits of membership in dōTERRA international including saving 25% off retail prices, fill out the short form and I will be in touch: http://ift.tt/1zmwGDz!

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Century-old drug reverses autism-like symptoms in fragile X mouse model

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Researchers previously reported that a drug used for almost a century to treat trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, reversed environmental autism-like symptoms in mice. Now, a new study suggests that a genetic form of autism-like symptoms in mice are also corrected with the drug, even when treatment was started in young adult mice.
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect 1 to 2 percent of children in the United States. Hundreds of genetic and environmental factors have been shown to increase the risk of ASD. Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine previously reported that a drug used for almost a century to treat trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, reversed environmental autism-like symptoms in mice.
Now, a new study published in this week’s online issue of Molecular Autism, suggests that a genetic form of autism-like symptoms in mice are also corrected with the drug, even when treatment was started in young adult mice.
The underlying mechanism, according to Robert K. Naviaux, MD, PhD, the new study’s principal investigator and professor of medicine at UC San Diego, is a phenomenon he calls the cellular danger response (CDR). When cells are exposed to danger in the form of a virus, infection, toxin, or even certain genetic mutations, they react defensively, shutting down ordinary activities and erecting barriers against the perceived threat. One consequence is that communication between cells is reduced, which the scientists say may interfere with brain development and function, leading to ASD.
Researchers treated a Fragile X genetic mouse model, one of the most commonly studied mouse models of ASD, with suramin, a drug long used for sleeping sickness. The approach, called antipurinergic therapy or APT, blocked the CDR signal, allowing cells to restore normal communication and reversing ASD symptoms.
“Our data show that the efficacy of APT cuts across disease models in ASD. Both the environmental and genetic mouse models responded with a complete, or near complete, reversal of ASD symptoms,” Naviaux said. “APT seems to be a common denominator in improving social behavior and brain synaptic abnormalities in these ASD models.”
Weekly treatment with suramin in the Fragile X genetic mouse model was started at nine weeks of age, roughly equivalent to 18 years in humans. Metabolite analysis identified 20 biochemical pathways associated with symptom improvements, 17 of which have been reported in human ASD. The findings of the six-month study also support the hypothesis that disturbances in purinergic signaling — a regulator of cellular functions, and mitochondria (prime regulators of the CDR) — play a significant role in ASD.
Naviaux noted that suramin is not a drug that can be used for more than a few months without a risk of toxicity in humans. However, he said it is the first of its kind in a new class of drugs that may not need to be given chronically to produce beneficial effects. New antipurinergic medicines, he said, might be given once or intermittently to unblock metabolism, restore more normal neural network function, improve resilience and permit improved development in response to conventional, interdisciplinary therapies and natural play.
“Correcting abnormalities in a mouse is a long way from a cure in humans,” cautioned Naviaux, who is also co-director of the Mitochondrial and Metabolic Disease Center at UC San Diego, “but our study adds momentum to discoveries at the crossroads of genetics, metabolism, innate immunity, and the environment for several childhood chronic disorders. These crossroads represent new leads in our efforts to understand the origins of autism and to develop treatments for children and adults with ASD.”
Co-authors include Jane C. Naviaux, Lin Wang, Kefeng Li, A. Taylor Bright, William A. Alaynick, Kenneth R. Williams and Susan B. Powell, all at UC San Diego.
This study was supported, in part, by the Jane Botsford Johnson Foundation, the UC San Diego Christini Foundation, the UC San Diego Mitochondrial Research Fund, and the Wright Family Foundation.
Story Source:
The above story is based on materials provided by University of California – San Diego. The original article was written by Scott LaFee. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.
Journal Reference:
Jane C Naviaux, Lin Wang, Kefeng Li, A Taylor Bright, William A Alaynick, Kenneth R Williams, Susan B Powell and Robert K Naviaux. Antipurinergic therapy corrects the autism-like features in the fragile X (Fmr1 knockout) mouse model. Molecular Autism, 2015 DOI: 10.1186/2040-2392-6-1
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University of California – San Diego. “Century-old drug reverses autism-like symptoms in fragile X mouse model.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 January 2015.

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dōTERRA Scientific Collaborations

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The potential benefits of essential oils are well understood and accepted by many as a reasonable and appropriate approach for health support. dōTERRA has established normal practices for exacting science and sound judgment. dōTERRA employs and partners with a number of scientists and medical professionals. Working with chemists, biological and microbiological scientists, botanists, and others creates a comprehensive understanding necessary for proper sourcing, analysis, and use of essential […]

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Ready for abundance?

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xo Ellice Campbell

Mind-body connection not a one-way street

Original content comes to us from Perception News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1FxFjCE
We usually think our mind is in control and telling our body what to do. But there is a lot of scientific evidence that shows the chatter between mind and body goes two ways, and the body is an integral part of how we think. In a new book, one expert provides the latest scientific evidence about the body’s influence on our psyche, drawing on work from her own laboratory and from colleagues around the world.

University of Chicago Professor Sian Beilock explores the body-mind connection Credit: Photo by Jason Smith

Beilock, a leading expert on the brain science behind human performance, believes the body-mind connection starts early.

“Movement matters with everyone, but it is especially important for babies and young children,” said Beilock. “Mobile kids hit cognitive milestones faster.” She said that simple steps like allowing babies to run around naked — when appropriate — can help them explore their worlds. Beilock said wearing diapers and using baby walkers can limit a baby’s ability to interact with the world and hinder the process of learning how to walk. The more quickly children learn how to walk and explore, the faster their cognitive development.

Incorporating physical activity into more subjects can help kids learn in school, according to Beilock.

“We can’t just keep students confined to their chairs — we have to get them up, out and moving,” Beilock said. “When the subjects are math or physics, getting students to actually physically experience some of the concepts they’re learning about changes how their brains process the information and can lead to better performance on a test.” Movement also helps explain the connection between music and math. Why do kids tend to excel in both? It’s because the brain areas controlling finger dexterity and number largely overlap. Beilock unpacks the latest research showing that when kids exercise their fingers through regular piano play, their grasp of numbers improves.

Exercise can aid mental health as well as academic achievement, according to Beilock. “The research shows that getting kids moving is important not only for their physical well-being, but for their mental well-being, too.” She said schools need to emphasize “the “4 Rs” — reading, (w)riting, (a)rithmetic and recess. Boys’ academic achievement may especially benefit from recess, she added.

Exercise is equally important for older adults, as it can promote healthy aging mentally and physically. “There are clear differences in brain health in fit, older adults compared with their more sedentary counterparts,” said Beilock. “And these differences carry consequences for thinking and reasoning as well as for memory.” Beilock stressed that aerobic exercise, which can alter the structure and functioning of the brain, is key for improving mental health. Activities like swimming, running, cycling, walking briskly or even doing household chores at a vigorous pace can benefit the brain, in addition to keeping the body fit.

How the Body Knows Its Mind provides many tips on how to use one’s body, actions or surroundings to stimulate the mind and to influence those around you. She offered a few suggestions to improve the body-mind connection:

• Take active breaks from work or vexing problems to give your brain a chance to regroup and reboot. Physically walking away from the problem for a few minutes may help you solve it.

• Your body’s posture and expressions are not just reflections of your mind — they can influence your mood. Stand tall to help give yourself confidence and to send a signal to those around you that you have brought your “A” game to the table. And be mindful of your facial expressions. Your brain uses your expressions as cues to feel emotions. Smiling can actually make you feel happier.

• Practice in the real conditions under which you will have to perform — whether it’s public speaking, a test or an important match. It’s also good to practice in front of others so when all eyes are on you, it’s nothing new.

• Write it out. Journaling can help you deal with the stress of a test or your worries in daily life. Physically downloading worries from your mind (by putting pen to paper) has positive performance outcomes and reducing that stress affects your health in good ways, too.

• Spend time in nature as often as you can, and find time to meditate. New science shows that a walk in the woods rejuvenates our minds and improves our ability to pay attention and focus. Meditation for even a few minutes a day can help alleviate anxiety and chronic pain. It also can help with self-control that may be helpful for working to break bad habits, like smoking.

“Little things we do can have a big effect,” said Beilock. “The idea of the book is that if we can understand the science behind how the body affects the brain, we will be in a great position to ensure that we’re always putting our best foot forward when it matters the most.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Chicago. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Chicago. “Mind-body connection not a one-way street.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 January 2015. .

Original content comes to us from Perception News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1FxFjCE

doTERRA Essential Oil Spotlight: Juniper Berry

Original content comes to us from dōTERRA Blog http://ift.tt/14QlXYO

Derived from the coniferous tree, Juniper Berry essential oil has a rich history of traditional uses and therapeutic benefits. Juniper Berry acts as a natural cleansing agent, both internally and externally. Juniper Berry supports healthy kidney and urinary function and is very beneficial to the skin. Its woody, spicy, yet fresh aroma has a calming effect that helps relieve tension and stress. When diffused, Juniper Berry helps to cleanse and purify the air.


Aromatic, Topical, Internal

Plant Part:
Berry

Extraction Method:
Steam distillation

Aromatic Description:
Balsamic, clean, woody, spicy

Main Chemical Components:
Alpha pinene, sabinene

Primary Benefits:

  • Supports healthy kidney and urinary function
  • May benefit problematic skin areas
  • Acts as a natural cleansing and detoxifying agent
  • Helps relieve tension and stress

Uses:

Add 1-2 drops of water or citrus drinks as part of a natural cleansing regime.

Apply 1 drop to problematic skin areas to promote a clear, healthy complexion.

Diffuse with citrus oils to freshen and purify the air and to lessen stress.

 dōTERRA essential oils can be purchased online, or from any of our Wellness Advocates. .

To begin experiencing dōTERRA Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade essential oils simply visit http://ift.tt/1pS67Qr and click shop or to become a Wellness advocate and enjoy all the benefits of membership in dōTERRA international including saving 25% off retail prices, fill out the short form and I will be in touch: http://ift.tt/1zmwGDz!

Original content from dōTERRA Blog http://ift.tt/14QlXYO

These statements have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. dōTERRA products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. Pregnant or lactating women and persons with known medical conditions should consult a physician prior to the use of any dōTERRA product.

Optimistic people have healthier hearts, according to research

Original content comes to us from Living Well News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1KuJn6P

Using the American Heart Association’s criteria, a study of 5,000 adults found that the most optimistic people had twice the odds of being in ideal cardiovascular health as their pessimistic counterparts.

People who have upbeat outlooks on life have significantly better cardiovascular health. Credit: © Photocreo Bednarek / Fotolia

People who have upbeat outlooks on life have significantly better cardiovascular health, suggests a new study that examined associations between optimism and heart health in more than 5,100 adults.

“Individuals with the highest levels of optimism have twice the odds of being in ideal cardiovascular health compared to their more pessimistic counterparts,” said lead author Rosalba Hernandez, a professor of social work at the University of Illinois. “This association remains significant, even after adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics and poor mental health.”

Participants’ cardiovascular health was assessed using seven metrics: blood pressure, body mass index, fasting plasma glucose and serum cholesterol levels, dietary intake, physical activity and tobacco use — the same metrics used by the American Heart Association to define heart health and being targeted by the AHA in its Life’s Simple 7 public awareness campaign.

In accordance with AHA’s heart-health criteria, the researchers allocated 0, 1 or 2 points — representing poor, intermediate and ideal scores, respectively — to participants on each of the seven health metrics, which were then summed to arrive at a total cardiovascular health score. Participants’ total health scores ranged from 0 to 14, with a higher total score indicative of better health.

The participants, who ranged in age from 45-84, also completed surveys that assessed their mental health, levels of optimism, and physical health, based upon self-reported extant medical diagnoses of arthritis, liver and kidney disease.

Individuals’ total health scores increased in tandem with their levels of optimism. People who were the most optimistic were 50 and 76 percent more likely to have total health scores in the intermediate or ideal ranges, respectively.

The association between optimism and cardiovascular health was even stronger when socio-demographic characteristics such as age, race and ethnicity, income and education status were factored in. People who were the most optimistic were twice as likely to have ideal cardiovascular health, and 55 percent more likely to have a total health score in the intermediate range, the researchers found.

Optimists had significantly better blood sugar and total cholesterol levels than their counterparts. They also were more physically active, had healthier body mass indexes and were less likely to smoke, according to a paper on the research that appears in the January/February 2015 issue of Health Behavior and Policy Review.

The findings may be of clinical significance, given that a 2013 study indicated that a one-point increase in an individual’s total-health score on the LS7 was associated with an 8 percent reduction in their risk of stroke, Hernandez said.

“At the population level, even this moderate difference in cardiovascular health translates into a significant reduction in death rates,” Hernandez said. “This evidence, which is hypothesized to occur through a biobehavioral mechanism, suggests that prevention strategies that target modification of psychological well-being — e.g., optimism — may be a potential avenue for AHA to reach its goal of improving Americans’ cardiovascular health by 20 percent before 2020.”

Believed to be the first study to examine the association of optimism and cardiovascular health in a large, ethnically and racially diverse population, the sample for the current study was 38 percent white, 28 percent African-American, 22 percent Hispanic/Latino and 12 percent Chinese.

Data for the study were derived from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, an ongoing examination of subclinical cardiovascular disease that includes 6,000 people from six U.S. regions, including Baltimore, Chicago, Forsyth County in North Carolina, and Los Angeles County.

Begun in July 2000, MESA followed participants for 11 years, collecting data every 18 months to two years. Hernandez, who is an affiliated investigator on MESA, is leading a team in conducting prospective analyses on the associations found between optimism and heart health.

“We now have available data to examine optimism at baseline and cardiovascular health a decade later,” said Hernandez, who expects to have an abstract completed in 2015.

Co-authors of the current study were Kiarri N. Kershaw of Northwestern University; Juned Siddique, Honghan Ning and Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, all of Northwestern University; Julia K. Boehm of Chapman University; Laura D. Kubzansky of Harvard University; and Ana Diez-Roux of Drexel University.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and the National Center for Research Resources funded the research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rosalba Hernandez, Kiarri N. Kershaw, Juned Siddique, Julia K. Boehm, Laura D. Kubzansky, Ana Diez-Roux, Hongyan Ning, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones. Optimism and Cardiovascular Health: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).Health Behavior and Policy Review, 2015; 2 (1): 62 DOI: 10.14485/HBPR.2.1.6

Cite This Page:

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. “Optimistic people have healthier hearts, study finds.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 January 2015.

Vía Living Well News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1KuJn6P

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